Posts in DIY
DIY Wall Hanging

I found an amazing vintage wall hanging at the thrift store and was shattered when I found out it was already sold. Not only that but it sold for $80! Come to find out in the world of vintage wall hangings this was a steal of a deal, they usually retail for anywhere from $300 to $1500. I knew my odds of finding another one while thrifting were slim and I definitely didn’t have the budget to buy one form a shop so I decided to make one myself with items I already had at home plus about $30 worth of yarn.

 Not pictured is the large stick I collected from my neighborhood walk which everything is attached to in order to hang on the wall. You could also use a wooden dowel or a curtain rod.

Not pictured is the large stick I collected from my neighborhood walk which everything is attached to in order to hang on the wall. You could also use a wooden dowel or a curtain rod.

I found a rug with interesting texture and fringe on the end as the base for the whole thing. I chose this pillow to incorporate because it has a great shape. A blanket (originally from target) that was made of long strands of yarn (huge bonus because it cut down on cost of yarn and time cutting all the long strands), about 8 rolls of yarn and a grass skirt to add some different texture.

You can easily thrift most of these items or may have things laying around your house. I suggest looking for items that already have lots of yarn, tassels, pre-existing woven shapes and using a rug that has fringe on the end makes it easy to tie on the stick.

That takes us to the first step. I attached the rug by tying the fringe around the stick and then wrapped the stick with yarn to hide the fringe.

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I used a needle and thread to hand sew the pillow onto the rug. The fringe on the sides was taken from the blanket that I deconstructed and tied around the stick using a larks head knot.

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The next step was creating these tassels with the rust orange yarn which I attached with a needle and thread. I wrapped the yarn about 25 times around a book that measures 10” and there are 15 tassels.

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I knotted up small bunches of yarn and sewed them on by hand around the rest of the circle to really accentuate the shape.

 Detail of knots.

Detail of knots.

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At this point I adjusted the fringe on the sides and added some longer pieces to make it wider. The grass skirt was directly sewn on with needle and thread. The mustard yarn on the side is more tassels sewn onto the rug. I wrapped the yarn 25 times around our pink coffee table which measures 3’ and there are 6 tassels.

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The last thing I added was, yep, more tassels made from the dark brown yarn. I wrapped the yarn about 40 times around a book that measures 12” to make these big tassels and there are 14 of them.

 Layers and more layers make it interesting.

Layers and more layers make it interesting.

 Here’s how it’s attached to the wall. In a normal home your walls won’t be crumbling away like ours. You should be able to put a plug or  wall anchor  in the wall for additional support.

Here’s how it’s attached to the wall. In a normal home your walls won’t be crumbling away like ours. You should be able to put a plug or wall anchor in the wall for additional support.

That’s it! The whole process took about two days and cost around $30 since I had a lot of the items on hand. Well worth it and now I have an original piece with meaning. Good luck!

DIY Bench

We made these very easy very simple benches that fit together to make a nice daybed out of 2x4s and plywood for under $50. Here’s the step by step:

What you need: (FOR 1 BENCH. To make a daybed double the amount of items)

2” x 4” x 8’ pine stud (x3)

2’ x 4’ sheet of plywood or OSB board about 1/2” thick (x1)

Box of 4” wood screws (x1)

pocket hole jig

electric screw driver

Directions:

Keep in mind, the measurments we went with were to fit specific pillows that I used for the cushions. You can adjust slightly to make them any size you want.

 We left one end of the bench open so that when the two benches slid together the cushions would be flush.

We left one end of the bench open so that when the two benches slid together the cushions would be flush.

Cut the 2x4 stud into the following lengths:

44” (x2)

24” (x6)

10” (x4)

First we created simple square frames for the legs and attached a brace in the middle.

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 For the brace in the middle we used a pocket hole jig so the screws went in at an angle.

For the brace in the middle we used a pocket hole jig so the screws went in at an angle.

Once the legs and brace were attached together we flipped it upside-down, placed the legs on 2” blocks (scrap pieces of wood) to elevate it off the ground and screwed the top frame into the legs.

 Legs and brace are pictured upside-down. The measuring tape indicates 2” elevated off the ground. This way when the top frame is attached it will create a lip to hold the cushions.

Legs and brace are pictured upside-down. The measuring tape indicates 2” elevated off the ground. This way when the top frame is attached it will create a lip to hold the cushions.

 All of the stud, apart from the brace, were attached at the ends with 2 screws.

All of the stud, apart from the brace, were attached at the ends with 2 screws.

 View from the top

View from the top

 Once the frame is complete the OSB can be cut to size and slide down on top.

Once the frame is complete the OSB can be cut to size and slide down on top.

I know this is a pretty roughly explained DIY but I hope with the photos you can decipher what we did!

 2 benches pushed together to make a daybed

2 benches pushed together to make a daybed

 Single bench

Single bench

 Reconfigured into an L shape

Reconfigured into an L shape

DIYliz kamaruldaybed, bench, diy
Minted Art and Mural

This blog post is sponsored by Minted.

Usually when I decide to make bold changes in our home it’s because I’ve been inspired by something. In this case, I decided to paint a whole wall because of a great piece of art. I spotted this piece on Minted and was immediately drawn to it because of the bold colors and abstract shapes. The artist, Christina Flowers, spoke of her art saying “each piece is as much about the journey as it is the finished work and that there is always magic in exploration.” That totally resonated with me and our home, ever evolving.

I quickly realized after hanging up the artwork that a white blank wall would never do it justice. This art was vibrant and needed a vibrant backdrop!

 Plain wall

Plain wall

I decided to paint a similar abstract pattern on the wall to compliment the art but in a neutral color palette so as not to take away from it. First I uploaded a photo of the wall and art on to the computer so I could visualize what it would look like before I actually painted.

 Computer mockup

Computer mockup

 It’s worth spending money on a nice brush to get clean lines.

It’s worth spending money on a nice brush to get clean lines.

Once I was happy with the design all it took were a few sample pots of paint. I drew the design on the wall with a pencil and used a nice 1 1/2” angled brush to complete the mural. I love how the wall seems so busy by itself but somehow seems to step back and make the artwork pop!

 Finished room

Finished room

It’s funny how a great change can come when you least expect it. If I hadn’t chosen this particular piece then this whole space never would have come to be. I spent a looooong time browsing through Minted’s art selection. There are a ton of amazing pieces and information about all the artists who created them which I always love to read about.

 …Something I noticed after the space was completed is how perfectly the art matches the chairs. I was drawn to this piece because of the colors which seem to show up time and time again throughout our home. It must be instinct at this point ;)

…Something I noticed after the space was completed is how perfectly the art matches the chairs. I was drawn to this piece because of the colors which seem to show up time and time again throughout our home. It must be instinct at this point ;)

  Minted  art

Minted art

I’m so happy with this piece of art and stand by the idea that you can’t force creativity. Inspiration can strike at any time and when it does great things will happen. Like magic.

DIYliz kamarulminted, art, mural, painting
Faux Stained Glass

Here's a quick step by step of an easy and affordable way to use window film samples to create a faux stained glass.

 This is the window I selected for my project, a few of the samples are hanging here to see what they look like up.

This is the window I selected for my project, a few of the samples are hanging here to see what they look like up.

 

I ordered my samples from these two companies: Decorative FilmsSolar Graphics

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First I measured the window pane and drew it on paper so I could cut out the shapes I wanted to use of the samples.

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Some of the samples were static cling and others were not.  I used clear tape in small strips along the edges to attach those to the window.

 As you can see my measurements were not precise and there is some overlap.  It doesn't bother but me, but I'm not a perfectionist ;)  I also doubled up on some of the colors to make them more intense. 

As you can see my measurements were not precise and there is some overlap.  It doesn't bother but me, but I'm not a perfectionist ;)  I also doubled up on some of the colors to make them more intense. 

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The final result is quite stunning and it cost about $12 total!

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Upholstery and Mold

Here's a step by step for re-upholstery thanks to my partnership with Fabric.com

Obviously this tutorial wont be identical for every project but it's a general idea of the steps to take.  Plus I encountered mold which was an unexpected bonus.

So, here we go.  Let's start with the before shot:  

 My $11 thrift store chairs.

My $11 thrift store chairs.

First step was to figure out how to take the chair apart so I could remove the old upholstery.

 First I removed the base.

First I removed the base.

 The back of the chair was attached inside the base.

The back of the chair was attached inside the base.

 Now that the chair was taken apart I could see how the upholstery was attached.

Now that the chair was taken apart I could see how the upholstery was attached.

 I used an knife to cut the fabric off of the chair which was stapled down.

I used an knife to cut the fabric off of the chair which was stapled down.

 The next step was to use a seam ripper to separate the pieces of the fabric so I could have a simple pattern to trace onto the new fabric.

The next step was to use a seam ripper to separate the pieces of the fabric so I could have a simple pattern to trace onto the new fabric.

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 I chose this fabric by Justina Blackeney from  Fabric.com  called  Geo Jacquard Mango .  I ended up using the backside unexpectedly because I thought it worked better for this project.

I chose this fabric by Justina Blackeney from Fabric.com called Geo Jacquard Mango.  I ended up using the backside unexpectedly because I thought it worked better for this project.

 And this fabric, also by Justina, from  Fabric.com  called  Dabito Jacquard Moroccan

And this fabric, also by Justina, from Fabric.com called Dabito Jacquard Moroccan

 Once all the pieces were cut and sewn back together the fabric slipped back over the base and I used a staple gun to reattach.

Once all the pieces were cut and sewn back together the fabric slipped back over the base and I used a staple gun to reattach.

Now here's where the not so fun or easy part began:  MOLD

 After removing the backs, I discovered 3 of the 4 chairs had mold on them, mostly on the wood.  The areas of fabric that had mold I cut and removed entirely.  Here's what I did to remove it from the wood and just a disclaimer, I am not an expert, I just googled what to do and hoped for the best!

After removing the backs, I discovered 3 of the 4 chairs had mold on them, mostly on the wood.  The areas of fabric that had mold I cut and removed entirely.  Here's what I did to remove it from the wood and just a disclaimer, I am not an expert, I just googled what to do and hoped for the best!

 I used bleach and vinegar.  Also you should wear protective gloves and a mask during this process...  First I sprayed the mold with bleach and used a damp rag to remove all the loose mold.  It's best to wipe it down after spraying because if you wipe it off when it's dry the spores are more likely to fly around in the air.  Then I sprayed again with a mixture of bleach and vinegar and used an electric sander to sand down the wood while it was damp until enough layers were removed and the mold looked like it was gone.

I used bleach and vinegar.  Also you should wear protective gloves and a mask during this process...  First I sprayed the mold with bleach and used a damp rag to remove all the loose mold.  It's best to wipe it down after spraying because if you wipe it off when it's dry the spores are more likely to fly around in the air.  Then I sprayed again with a mixture of bleach and vinegar and used an electric sander to sand down the wood while it was damp until enough layers were removed and the mold looked like it was gone.

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 Here's after many rounds of spraying with the bleach vinegar mixture and sanding several times.  There were still some dark spots but after some research felt confident that it was just stained from the mold.  Just to be safe I lightly sprayed with the bleach and vinegar mixture again and let them sit outside to fully dry.  

Here's after many rounds of spraying with the bleach vinegar mixture and sanding several times.  There were still some dark spots but after some research felt confident that it was just stained from the mold.  Just to be safe I lightly sprayed with the bleach and vinegar mixture again and let them sit outside to fully dry.  

So, after that fiasco I was finally able to put the whole chair back together and voila! Just like new.

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Going Gray

I found my first gray hair when I was 17.  The next 5 years I could manage it by obsessively pulling them out but eventually there were so many I had to start coloring my hair (I'm naturally a brunette)...  I wasn't ready at 22 years old to embrace the gray.   About 4 years ago the gray became so thick that coloring my roots wasn't working anymore, a month or so after coloring I was faced with a gray stripe down my head from the grow out which made me feel my older than I am!  So I decided to start the process of going gray and, as it happened, gray hair was very popular at the time, lucky me!

My first trip to the salon I told her I wanted to transition to gray and brought photo examples.  Unfortunately platinum/blonde/gray was not her specialty and she (for some strange reason) died my roots VERY dark and the rest of my hair a reddish brown.  I knew transitioning to gray was going to take a few steps because my hair was brown but this was all wrong... I didn't think to take a picture of the before but imagine it was just med brown....  This is the after below.

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That experience was a lesson learned.  It is so important to find someone who specializes in blonde/gray hair.  So, I did my research and found Zabic Stylehouse (in Portland OR).  They transitioned my hair to a blonder color with subtle pieces going up to my roots so as the gray grew out it would be less noticeable.  They also color with Olaplex which is much healthier for blonde coloring.  I used the Olaplex conditioner frequently to maintain my hair. 

After photo below.. 

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My next trip in I went even more gray blonde with a touch of purple and colored closer to the roots.

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My hair has grown out now for about 10 months since coloring and the transition is much easier with no harsh grow out lines.  This process will work if you are at least 40% gray, the grow out will blend your natural hair and the dyed hair...  The next time I go in to color (if I ever do) I may have some subtle highlights or balayage added.

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I've recently discovered Kristen Ess products.  Her purple shampoo and conditioner   is AMAZING (it's linked there but can also be bought at target)  You may have seen on my instagram when I was talking about how my hair was turning green.  I tried all the home remedies and so many different purple shampoos.  This was the ONLY product that worked to remove the green and brass colors.  I just tried her pink tint on the tips of my hair as well and love it!

So, I encourage anyone going gray to go for it!  Find a great colorist who specializes in platinum/gray and use good products to maintain!

DIYliz kamarulhair, gray, grey
Black Geometric Wall

I know everyone is curious about the black wall... What's it made of?  How is it attached to the wall?  So here's everything you need to know to make your own and how ours came about...

Our living room is a busy space with all the artwork and the infamous couch and I really wanted the black wall to be simple so it wouldn’t compete with the gallery wall but I didn’t want it to be boring and plain either.  I’m not exactly sure where the idea came from but I knew that texture would be a good solution.

 Bo's contribution to the black wall pattern.

Bo's contribution to the black wall pattern.

We had a thin sheet of plywood laying around so I traced a ton of triangles and Tim helped cut them out with a miter saw.  Of course our dog Bo played a part in this too.  I had several triangles laid out on the ground trying to determine a pattern and just after I snapped a picture Bo came running through and scattered the edge of the layout which turned out to look pretty interesting so I ran with it and used his thoughtful design on the wall.  I used matte black spray paint on the top of the triangles and left the edges raw (the black wall is painted with Behr Broadway in a semi-gloss) then used a nail gun to attach them to the wall.  TaDa!