Posts tagged diy
Hanging wallpaper with Rebel Walls

We have hung up all types of wallpaper, peel and stick, pre-pasted and the type where you add glue to the paper. This was the first time we tried the glue on the wall technique and I think so far it’s my favorite way to hang paper! There is way less mess and it’s very forgiving.

This wallpaper was gifted from Rebel Walls and it’s called Secret Garden Lush. We decided to hang it in our master bathroom to create a jungle vibe to which I can safely say, mission accomplished. I was worried at first about the humidity from taking showers and how that would work with the wallpaper but we came up with a solution which I’ll share below.

One thing I particularly like about Rebel Walls wallpaper is that they custom cut the mural to fit your wall and each piece is labeled in the order it should be hung for easy installation.

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I laid out the pieces on the floor prior to hanging.

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The wallpaper came with glue which was a powder that you add water to. I used a foam roller to apply the glue generously to the wall a little bit wider than the paper. Then you simply apply the paper directly to the wall using a wallpaper smoothing tool to make sure it sticks to the wall and to remove any air bubbles. Also be sure the first piece is very straight so the mural doesn’t get skewed as you add each piece.

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The paper was easy to adjust and apply. I would recommend two people for the job to make sure the paper goes on straight.

The solution I found to seal the wallpaper and protect from mold is a decorators varnish. I applied this over the whole mural. It goes on very smooth, has different sheen options and doesn’t cause any discoloration.

Another wall complete, now on to the next!

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Room transformation + DIY frame

I’ve been so excited about helping our neighbors refresh their living room. Sometimes decorating a space can be daunting, you don’t know where to begin and there’s a fear of spending a lot of money to make it happen.

For this project, to make it easy, we reused some of the items they already had, thrifted about 80% and found a few perfect pieces from small businesses. Plus we came up with a great affordable way to frame large art that cost a total of $80 to make TWO frames. Details at the end of the post.

Let’s talk thrifted items. Some people love thrifting, some people hate it, some people just aren’t sure. Our neighbors were the last category and I can confidently say they are now addicted! We found the couch, huge rattan shelf, mirror, two camel colored chairs, one green chair and table lamp combo all from either craigslist, facebook marketplace or thrift stores ALL for under $700. That’s basically the cost of on cheap sofa.

Enormous rattan bookcase found on facebook marketplace. Rug from Swoon Rugs, pillow from Holistic Habitat.

Enormous rattan bookcase found on facebook marketplace. Rug from Swoon Rugs, pillow from Holistic Habitat.

Now, as much as I love thrifting I do love mixing old with new and see value in investing in good pieces that you love and intend on keeping. We found some great items from some small companies that blend so good with all of our thrift scores.

We chose two rugs from Swoon Rugs, one vintage under the chairs and one new under the coffee table. She has a rotating collection of unique and gorgeous pieces.

Rug from Swoon Rugs. Chairs and glass table lamp combo thrifted.

Rug from Swoon Rugs. Chairs and glass table lamp combo thrifted.

This terra-cotta plant stand with the pots was so unique and fit perfectly in this spot, it was a must have from Holistic Habitat. We found our pillows there too. A good quality pillow goes a long way!

Artwork from Christina Flowers.

Artwork from Christina Flowers.

Face pillow from Holistic Habitat. Green chair found on Craigslist.

Face pillow from Holistic Habitat. Green chair found on Craigslist.

The sconce above the TV is truly AMAZING. What a statement piece! Locally made here in New Orleans by Sazerac Stiches.

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Lastly these two piece of art created by Christina Flowers. I love the abstract shapes and perfect color combo.

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So now let’s get into how we created these custom and affordable frames.

Supplies:

1/4” 4ft. X 8ft. sanded plywood

Any moulding, length depending the size of the art

Gorilla glue heavy duty construction adhesive

Blue tape

Ruler

Saw

D ring picture hanging kit

Screwdriver

Instructions:

Plywood can be cut at Home Depot. Our artwork measured 32” x 40” and I wanted a 6” boarder around the art so I had the plywood cut to 42” x 56”.

I always have wood cut here before trying to fit it in my car. Saves time and effort.

I always have wood cut here before trying to fit it in my car. Saves time and effort.

The moulding was cut to fit around the perimeter of the art. We did this at home and cut them at a 45 degree angle.

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Measure the board to find out where the art will sit centered on the board and tape it in place. Measure so the moulding will cover half of the art and the other half on the board. Place tape in the corners so you can quickly set the moulding in the correct spot once it has glue on it.

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Use gorilla glue construction adhesive to attach the moulding around the artwork making sure that only the edge of the moulding that touches the board has glue on it so if you ever decide to remove the art it won’t be damaged.

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The glue needs to be held down for at least one minute, we used books and let it sit overnight to be sure it was secure.

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24 hrs later attach the D rings and wire to the back of the artwork. All done and ready to hang!

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DIY Wall Hanging

I found an amazing vintage wall hanging at the thrift store and was shattered when I found out it was already sold. Not only that but it sold for $80! Come to find out in the world of vintage wall hangings this was a steal of a deal, they usually retail for anywhere from $300 to $1500. I knew my odds of finding another one while thrifting were slim and I definitely didn’t have the budget to buy one form a shop so I decided to make one myself with items I already had at home plus about $30 worth of yarn.

Not pictured is the large stick I collected from my neighborhood walk which everything is attached to in order to hang on the wall. You could also use a wooden dowel or a curtain rod.

Not pictured is the large stick I collected from my neighborhood walk which everything is attached to in order to hang on the wall. You could also use a wooden dowel or a curtain rod.

I found a rug with interesting texture and fringe on the end as the base for the whole thing. I chose this pillow to incorporate because it has a great shape. A blanket (originally from target) that was made of long strands of yarn (huge bonus because it cut down on cost of yarn and time cutting all the long strands), about 8 rolls of yarn and a grass skirt to add some different texture.

You can easily thrift most of these items or may have things laying around your house. I suggest looking for items that already have lots of yarn, tassels, pre-existing woven shapes and using a rug that has fringe on the end makes it easy to tie on the stick.

That takes us to the first step. I attached the rug by tying the fringe around the stick and then wrapped the stick with yarn to hide the fringe.

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I used a needle and thread to hand sew the pillow onto the rug. The fringe on the sides was taken from the blanket that I deconstructed and tied around the stick using a larks head knot.

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The next step was creating these tassels with the rust orange yarn which I attached with a needle and thread. I wrapped the yarn about 25 times around a book that measures 10” and there are 15 tassels.

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I knotted up small bunches of yarn and sewed them on by hand around the rest of the circle to really accentuate the shape.

Detail of knots.

Detail of knots.

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At this point I adjusted the fringe on the sides and added some longer pieces to make it wider. The grass skirt was directly sewn on with needle and thread. The mustard yarn on the side is more tassels sewn onto the rug. I wrapped the yarn 25 times around our pink coffee table which measures 3’ and there are 6 tassels.

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The last thing I added was, yep, more tassels made from the dark brown yarn. I wrapped the yarn about 40 times around a book that measures 12” to make these big tassels and there are 14 of them.

Layers and more layers make it interesting.

Layers and more layers make it interesting.

Here’s how it’s attached to the wall. In a normal home your walls won’t be crumbling away like ours. You should be able to put a plug or  wall anchor  in the wall for additional support.

Here’s how it’s attached to the wall. In a normal home your walls won’t be crumbling away like ours. You should be able to put a plug or wall anchor in the wall for additional support.

That’s it! The whole process took about two days and cost around $30 since I had a lot of the items on hand. Well worth it and now I have an original piece with meaning. Good luck!

DIY Bench

We made these very easy very simple benches that fit together to make a nice daybed out of 2x4s and plywood for under $50. Here’s the step by step:

What you need: (FOR 1 BENCH. To make a daybed double the amount of items)

2” x 4” x 8’ pine stud (x3)

2’ x 4’ sheet of plywood or OSB board about 1/2” thick (x1)

Box of 4” wood screws (x1)

pocket hole jig

electric screw driver

Directions:

Keep in mind, the measurments we went with were to fit specific pillows that I used for the cushions. You can adjust slightly to make them any size you want.

We left one end of the bench open so that when the two benches slid together the cushions would be flush.

We left one end of the bench open so that when the two benches slid together the cushions would be flush.

Cut the 2x4 stud into the following lengths:

44” (x2)

24” (x6)

10” (x4)

First we created simple square frames for the legs and attached a brace in the middle.

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For the brace in the middle we used a pocket hole jig so the screws went in at an angle.

For the brace in the middle we used a pocket hole jig so the screws went in at an angle.

Once the legs and brace were attached together we flipped it upside-down, placed the legs on 2” blocks (scrap pieces of wood) to elevate it off the ground and screwed the top frame into the legs.

Legs and brace are pictured upside-down. The measuring tape indicates 2” elevated off the ground. This way when the top frame is attached it will create a lip to hold the cushions.

Legs and brace are pictured upside-down. The measuring tape indicates 2” elevated off the ground. This way when the top frame is attached it will create a lip to hold the cushions.

All of the stud, apart from the brace, were attached at the ends with 2 screws.

All of the stud, apart from the brace, were attached at the ends with 2 screws.

View from the top

View from the top

Once the frame is complete the OSB can be cut to size and slide down on top.

Once the frame is complete the OSB can be cut to size and slide down on top.

I know this is a pretty roughly explained DIY but I hope with the photos you can decipher what we did!

2 benches pushed together to make a daybed

2 benches pushed together to make a daybed

Single bench

Single bench

Reconfigured into an L shape

Reconfigured into an L shape

DESIGNliz kamaruldaybed, bench, diy
Upholstery and Mold

Here's a step by step for re-upholstery thanks to my partnership with Fabric.com

Obviously this tutorial wont be identical for every project but it's a general idea of the steps to take.  Plus I encountered mold which was an unexpected bonus.

So, here we go.  Let's start with the before shot:  

My $11 thrift store chairs.

My $11 thrift store chairs.

First step was to figure out how to take the chair apart so I could remove the old upholstery.

First I removed the base.

First I removed the base.

The back of the chair was attached inside the base.

The back of the chair was attached inside the base.

Now that the chair was taken apart I could see how the upholstery was attached.

Now that the chair was taken apart I could see how the upholstery was attached.

I used an knife to cut the fabric off of the chair which was stapled down.

I used an knife to cut the fabric off of the chair which was stapled down.

The next step was to use a seam ripper to separate the pieces of the fabric so I could have a simple pattern to trace onto the new fabric.

The next step was to use a seam ripper to separate the pieces of the fabric so I could have a simple pattern to trace onto the new fabric.

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I chose this fabric by Justina Blackeney from  Fabric.com  called  Geo Jacquard Mango . I ended up using the backside unexpectedly because I thought it worked better for this project.

I chose this fabric by Justina Blackeney from Fabric.com called Geo Jacquard Mango. I ended up using the backside unexpectedly because I thought it worked better for this project.

And this fabric, also by Justina, from  Fabric.com  called  Dabito Jacquard Moroccan

And this fabric, also by Justina, from Fabric.com called Dabito Jacquard Moroccan

Once all the pieces were cut and sewn back together the fabric slipped back over the base and I used a staple gun to reattach.

Once all the pieces were cut and sewn back together the fabric slipped back over the base and I used a staple gun to reattach.

Now here's where the not so fun or easy part began:  MOLD

After removing the backs, I discovered 3 of the 4 chairs had mold on them, mostly on the wood. The areas of fabric that had mold I cut and removed entirely. Here's what I did to remove it from the wood and just a disclaimer, I am not an expert, I just googled what to do and hoped for the best!

After removing the backs, I discovered 3 of the 4 chairs had mold on them, mostly on the wood. The areas of fabric that had mold I cut and removed entirely. Here's what I did to remove it from the wood and just a disclaimer, I am not an expert, I just googled what to do and hoped for the best!

I used bleach and vinegar. Also you should wear protective gloves and a mask during this process... First I sprayed the mold with bleach and used a damp rag to remove all the loose mold. It's best to wipe it down after spraying because if you wipe it off when it's dry the spores are more likely to fly around in the air. Then I sprayed again with a mixture of bleach and vinegar and used an electric sander to sand down the wood while it was damp until enough layers were removed and the mold looked like it was gone.

I used bleach and vinegar. Also you should wear protective gloves and a mask during this process... First I sprayed the mold with bleach and used a damp rag to remove all the loose mold. It's best to wipe it down after spraying because if you wipe it off when it's dry the spores are more likely to fly around in the air. Then I sprayed again with a mixture of bleach and vinegar and used an electric sander to sand down the wood while it was damp until enough layers were removed and the mold looked like it was gone.

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Here's after many rounds of spraying with the bleach vinegar mixture and sanding several times. There were still some dark spots but after some research felt confident that it was just stained from the mold. Just to be safe I lightly sprayed with the bleach and vinegar mixture again and let them sit outside to fully dry.

Here's after many rounds of spraying with the bleach vinegar mixture and sanding several times. There were still some dark spots but after some research felt confident that it was just stained from the mold. Just to be safe I lightly sprayed with the bleach and vinegar mixture again and let them sit outside to fully dry.

So, after that fiasco I was finally able to put the whole chair back together and voila! Just like new.

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RV Renovation Part 1

This is long overdue but here we go.  Here’s all the information for the renovation of the RV from front to back, top to bottom…

Part 1 covers: Floors, Ceiling, Windows, Cab, Dining and Kitchen.

First we had to remove all the old wallpaper, there was a lot!  The easiest way to do this was score the paper in thin strips, then use a heat gun to warm up the paper and slowly peel off very time consuming!

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Next the whole interior of the RV was repainted.  I used Zinser 123 primer which wasn’t great, it took soooo many coats to cover (I think I painted 8 or 9 coats).  The white top coat is Behr Ultra Premium White.

We replaced the old carpet with click and lock vinyl from Lumber Liquidators, Clear Lake Chesnut, easy installation and we used an additional adhesive just to be safe (Loctite 2 in 1 seal and bond)

For the ceiling I chose a wallpaper Frond pattern from Anthropologie.  I love the bold design and plant anything is good by me.  It was surprisingly easy to install.  The wallpaper was pre glued so we wet the back with water using a foam roller and it went up quick.

One downside to wallpaper on the ceiling of the RV is that the Winnebago is always moving, vibrating while we drive and flexing with temperature changes.  Because of this there are a few areas where the wallpaper has ripped and it buckles every now and then depending on the temperature.

I spray painted all the window trim black with an appliance spray paint as well as the screws.  Quick tip:  push the screws into cardboard to easily paint the tops.

For window coverings we used custom cut white roller blinds from home depot and for the larger windows I made window coverings out of felt and attached magnets around the edge so they can be easily hung and removed during the day for a cleaner look.  They required no sewing at all!  The magnets were sticky on one side so they were easily attached as well.

The lock on the front door was the standard lock that came with the RV and we quickly discovered that ANY key could unlock it.  We decided to get an electronic keyless lock and tried two different ones.  The first was terrible and broke almost immediately it was the AP Products 013-509 Electric Travel Trailer Lock. The second one is much better and so far we are really happy with it:  RVLOCK KEYLESS CLASS C/A STYLE ENTRY HANDLE

CAB:

We used FLOR carpet tiles to replace the old carpet in the cab Tailored Touch.  It was fairly easy except for the area that covers the engine (the dog house) Tim had to cut a TON of slices to wrap around the curved edges.  We used an adhesive to attach the carpet and a brad nail gun.

The chairs were tough to cover and I had my mom assist me because I have no patience when it comes to sewing.  We ended up using an old blanket and made slip covers for the top part of the seat, for the bottom I laid sheep skin throws from Cowboy Kate.

The rest of the cab area was in great condition.  We added a backup camera which we keep on all the time in replacement of a rear view mirror.  It is so helpful and necessary.  We found it on Amazon and Tim installed it.

DINING AREA:

The cushions were reupholstered (thanks mom) with fabric from Whole 9 Yards in Portland. Pillows from LoLoi designed by Justina Blakeny.

For the table I chose an acrylic top and had it custom made to fit from a local plastic company.  It really helps keep the space feel open and although it does scratch a little it’s worth it! Installing acrylic can be tricky because when you put screws through it you run the risk of cracking.  We slowly drilled pilot holes with a dull drill bit prior to screwing it down to prevent this from happening.

The table leg was found at the reclaim it store in Portland and to reinforce where the leg meets the table we added a longer piece of wood cut into a nice shape and secured with screws.

There was storage under the dining benches (which were original to the space) but the only way to access it was to remove the cushions and seats.  We decided to add a pull out drawer for easy access on one side (thanks for building that dad!)  On the other side we added a cabinet drawer where we could access our safe (a must have for keeping valuables).

KITCHEN:

We replaced the old sink with a new white plastic one made for RVs, nice and lightweight.  The faucet is from Rejuvenation and although heavy (we tried to keep in mind the weight of everything we used because the heavier the RV gets, the worse the gas mileage) completely worth it for the style it brings!

The black and white wood pattern wallpaper is from Hygge & West.  I hung that one up by myself and it didn’t go as well without Tim giving me direction.  I cut out the window shape and then hung the paper, I should have hung the paper first and then cut out the window… Oh well, you live you learn.  This one needed an adhesive I applied with a brush.  Now that it's up you can't even notice my mistakes.

The wood triangles next the the stove were cut out of thin ply wood and painted with a clear coat of poly then glued to the wall with the same Loctite used on the floor.

We replaced the counters and made new ones out of plywood.  Tim cut an extra piece for the edge to make it look thicker than it actually is.  We used a clear poly to finish.

For all the cabinets I chose leather pulls with gold details from Rejuvenation and then drift wood that I found for the larger cabinets.

In the interior of the cabinets we built additional dividers to maximize the space.

Now for the best part.  Before and after shots!

 

 

That's all for part 1, part 2 coming soon!!