Posts tagged upholstery
Upholstery

This post is thanks to a gifted collaboration with The Whole 9 Yards.

I recently decided to reupholster our couch cushions. The first time I paid someone to do it for me because it felt overwhelming, this time I decided to attempt it myself and it wasn’t so hard. I found the fabric at one of my favorite stores I discovered in Portland Oregon called The Whole 9 Yards. They are a small business with a great selection of fabrics. The black and white upholstery fabric on the couch was from them and unfortunately it’s out of stock but I found a great pattern called Campfire that would be a similar alternative. We had this fabric on the couch for three years with two wild dogs and it still looks like new!

IMG_7625.JPG

We also used a gorgeous palm fabric called St Kitt for our RV dining benches and it was excellent.

IMG_7632.JPG

I’ve documented each step of the process below so if you are considering a project yourself this may be a good reference of how to start.

The first thing I did was remove the old cover so I could get an idea of how she sewed it. I was surprised to find out she used one large piece of fabric and simply folded the corners to create the rectangular shape.

IMG_7665.JPG

So, I took measurements and cut the fabric to the correct size, then folded it in half, right sides together, and sewed along the two edges. The fabric I chose is called Vivo Spicy Spice and it’s velvet.

IMG_7669.JPG
IMG_7677.JPG

After that I pressed the corner into a triangular shape with the seam running down the middle and measured in 2.5” from the tip. I drew a line across and sewed it. When the fabric is turned right side out you can see it created the corner for the cushion which measures 5” thick. I repeated that step for the other three corners.

IMG_7674.JPG
IMG_7672.JPG

Next I removed the zipper from the old cushion and pinned it along the edge of the new fabric which I folded back a half inch. The area circled in red is very important. A little piece of fabric should be sewn on to each end of the zipper to prevent the pull from fully sliding off the teeth of the zipper.

IMG_7679.JPG
IMG_7675.JPG

The whole process took me about a day to figure it out and sew.

IMG_7673.JPG

I love the new bold orange cushions, it feels like a whole new couch.

IMG_7680.JPG

I’ve chosen some of my favorite upholstery fabrics they currently have in stock listed below. I actually had to stop selecting fabrics because there were too many and my list could go on forever…

If you are interested in any of these fabrics or anything else currently in stock on their website (Whole9yards) you can call or email them to order and mention you found them through my blog or instagram to receive a discount! Valid through August 31 2019.

Upholstery and Mold

Here's a step by step for re-upholstery thanks to my partnership with Fabric.com

Obviously this tutorial wont be identical for every project but it's a general idea of the steps to take.  Plus I encountered mold which was an unexpected bonus.

So, here we go.  Let's start with the before shot:  

My $11 thrift store chairs.

My $11 thrift store chairs.

First step was to figure out how to take the chair apart so I could remove the old upholstery.

First I removed the base.

First I removed the base.

The back of the chair was attached inside the base.

The back of the chair was attached inside the base.

Now that the chair was taken apart I could see how the upholstery was attached.

Now that the chair was taken apart I could see how the upholstery was attached.

I used an knife to cut the fabric off of the chair which was stapled down.

I used an knife to cut the fabric off of the chair which was stapled down.

The next step was to use a seam ripper to separate the pieces of the fabric so I could have a simple pattern to trace onto the new fabric.

The next step was to use a seam ripper to separate the pieces of the fabric so I could have a simple pattern to trace onto the new fabric.

trace pattern.jpg
I chose this fabric by Justina Blackeney from  Fabric.com  called  Geo Jacquard Mango . I ended up using the backside unexpectedly because I thought it worked better for this project.

I chose this fabric by Justina Blackeney from Fabric.com called Geo Jacquard Mango. I ended up using the backside unexpectedly because I thought it worked better for this project.

And this fabric, also by Justina, from  Fabric.com  called  Dabito Jacquard Moroccan

And this fabric, also by Justina, from Fabric.com called Dabito Jacquard Moroccan

Once all the pieces were cut and sewn back together the fabric slipped back over the base and I used a staple gun to reattach.

Once all the pieces were cut and sewn back together the fabric slipped back over the base and I used a staple gun to reattach.

Now here's where the not so fun or easy part began:  MOLD

After removing the backs, I discovered 3 of the 4 chairs had mold on them, mostly on the wood. The areas of fabric that had mold I cut and removed entirely. Here's what I did to remove it from the wood and just a disclaimer, I am not an expert, I just googled what to do and hoped for the best!

After removing the backs, I discovered 3 of the 4 chairs had mold on them, mostly on the wood. The areas of fabric that had mold I cut and removed entirely. Here's what I did to remove it from the wood and just a disclaimer, I am not an expert, I just googled what to do and hoped for the best!

I used bleach and vinegar. Also you should wear protective gloves and a mask during this process... First I sprayed the mold with bleach and used a damp rag to remove all the loose mold. It's best to wipe it down after spraying because if you wipe it off when it's dry the spores are more likely to fly around in the air. Then I sprayed again with a mixture of bleach and vinegar and used an electric sander to sand down the wood while it was damp until enough layers were removed and the mold looked like it was gone.

I used bleach and vinegar. Also you should wear protective gloves and a mask during this process... First I sprayed the mold with bleach and used a damp rag to remove all the loose mold. It's best to wipe it down after spraying because if you wipe it off when it's dry the spores are more likely to fly around in the air. Then I sprayed again with a mixture of bleach and vinegar and used an electric sander to sand down the wood while it was damp until enough layers were removed and the mold looked like it was gone.

sander.jpg
Here's after many rounds of spraying with the bleach vinegar mixture and sanding several times. There were still some dark spots but after some research felt confident that it was just stained from the mold. Just to be safe I lightly sprayed with the bleach and vinegar mixture again and let them sit outside to fully dry.

Here's after many rounds of spraying with the bleach vinegar mixture and sanding several times. There were still some dark spots but after some research felt confident that it was just stained from the mold. Just to be safe I lightly sprayed with the bleach and vinegar mixture again and let them sit outside to fully dry.

So, after that fiasco I was finally able to put the whole chair back together and voila! Just like new.

after.jpg